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Creating My First Repo

For my Open Source class at school, I had a lab to create a repo. This was my first repo ever and it was very fun to do. I had very detailed instructions on what to do and I got the hang of it very fast. It's interesting how open source works. I chose to use the Rust library to work on the lab. The lab is a multi step lab and will be added onto in the upcoming weeks. I had to design a library for obtaining file info.

The best part about open source is that it is open source! Meaning as long as I follow the license rules of other projects, I can essentially reuse their code. Instead of reinventing the wheel, I can build on what already exists. And that's the power of open source.

The next step for me is to use continuous integration in my project. I have never done this and it will be a good experience and it will be very valuable to learn because it is something that can be used in my future projects. I will talk about it more in my next blog.

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